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PCGS-Graded Rare Coins Realize Monster Bids

1804 Draped Bust Eagle Takes $5.28 Million,  Other Rarities Score Strong Prices

Many important rare coins graded by Professional Coin Grading Service (www.PCGS.com) fetched record-breaking prices and hammered other notable bids at the landmark Bob R. Simpson Collection Part III sale offered by Heritage Auctions on January 20, 2021. Leading the way is an ultra-rare 1804 Plain 4 Draped Bust Eagle graded PCGS PR65+DCAM, which sold for $5,280,000 at the event. It is the finest specimen of its kind and is one of only four struck.

“The 1804 $10 is personally my favorite coin,” says PCGS President Brett Charville. “It’s basically a rarer version of an 1804 Draped Bust Dollar and has the added panache of being an early Federal proof gold piece that was then the largest-denomination coin minted in the United States,” Charville says, comparing the 1804 Draped Bust Eagle to the iconic 1804 Draped Bust Dollar, of which 15 specimens are known. Incidentally, the 1804 $10 that just sold for $5.28 million commanded some $1.1 million more than the most expensive 1804 Dollar, which has a record price of $4.14 million.

Other significant PCGS-graded rarities also took headlining figures, including:

  • 1792 Silver Center Pattern Cent, Judd-1 Pollock-1 PCGS SP67BN – $2,520,000
  • 1885 Trade Dollar, PCGS PR63+CAM – $2,100,000
  • 1796 Draped Bust Quarter Eagle, Stars on Obverse PCGS MS65 – $1,380,000
  • 1794 Flowing Hair Half Dollar PCGS MS64+ – $870,000
  • 1943-D Lincoln Cent Struck on Bronze Planchet PCGS MS64BN – $840,000

“While the strong prices these rarities fetched are well-deserved nods to their overall desirability, it also speaks to the trust that collectors place in rare coins graded by PCGS,” says Charville. “Ultimately, the best coins always end up in PCGS holders because PCGS encapsulation maximizes the value, security, and liquidity of their coins.”